The Miracle of the Reader’s Digest on the Shelf behind my Toilet

On the shelf behind my toilet sits the November 2013 issue of the Reader’s Digest. It’s magic.

I used to be a Reader’s Digest subscriber. Every month the newest issue would arrive, spend a day or two downstairs, then go upstairs to the shelf behind the toilet. The Reader’s Digest, with its one or two line “Quoteable Quotes,” the mid-length quiz, “It Pays to Increase Your Word Power,” and the longer “Drama In Real Life,” makes the ideal bathroom reading material. There is just the right amount of content for every situation, if you know what I mean.

Back in 2013 I stopped my subscription to Reader’s Digest. While I enjoyed every part of it, I just didn’t have time to consume it all before the next issue came. I found myself tossing them into recycling only partially read and feeling quite wasteful about it.

But we still needed bathroom reading material, so the November 2013 issue stayed put on the shelf behind the toilet. And it’s a good thing I kept it, because as I’ve already mentioned, it’s magic. After nearly two years, no matter what page I turn to in that 180 page magazine, I find something I’ve never seen before.

See? Magic!

“Did you read this article by Billy Crystal?” I ask Robert from my echo chamber one evening.

“There’s an article by Billy Crystal in there?” He garbles over the hum of his Sonicare, mouth full of toothpaste. At least I think that’s what he says.

“I know! How have I not seen it before now? It’s hilarious.” I glance at the cover again to make sure the Reader’s Digest Fairy hasn’t gifted us with a different issue. Nope, still November 2013.

A few days later, I find an interview with Malcolm Gladwell. Of course! I think to myself. This was when his last book came out. I seem to remember reading it before and I scan the questions and answers. They are fresh and interesting, as if I’m seeing them for the first time. Huh, I think.

The next week I take the “It Pays to Enrich Your Word Power” quiz and score 13 out of 15. I wonder how many times I’ve taken the quiz and scored the same. Will I ever learn the definition of venal or bumptious? Is this something I should be concerned about?

Concerned? I think. That I have a magic Reader’s Digest filled with endless reading material? 

I put the November 2013 Reader’s Digest back on the shelf behind the toilet and try to recall that word I didn’t know the definition for.

Until next time, magic Reader’s Digest!

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